From Corinth Back To Athens

Although I miss my family, brethren and friends, I am having the time of my life! Every day is jam packed with things to see, and each new thing that I see is enhancing my understanding of the Scriptures more and more. At the close of my last post I was reporting on the sites in Corinth. One thing that I did not mention is our visit to the Corinthian museum.

The Museum At Corinth

Although the museum is not all that large, it does contain some interesting items. I have listed some of these below with explanatory captions.

At the entrance of the museum are these headless statues. This is a common sight for this time period.

At the entrance of the museum are these headless statues. This is a common sight for this time period. When armies would attack a city they would lop the heads and arms off of the revered statues in the city, thus symbolizing the removal of strength and power.

There are headless statues all over the different sections of the Corinthian ruins. The following pictures are but a sampling of headless statues in and around the Museum of Corinth.

Off WIth Their Heads!

A Headless Statue Near Corinthian Bema

Headless Statue in Corinth Museum

More Headless Statues In The Museum of Corinth


Back To Athens

After leaving Corinth, we had a nice lunch near the Corinth Canal. Then we made the drive back into Athens. Incidentally, the town of Athens is a very adventurous place to drive/ride. Our bus drivers were amazing in handling the traffic. The traffic in Athens is incredibly congested. The growth of Athens has been remarkable. Back in the 1800’s, the population of the city was approximately 10, 000 people. Presently, there are an estimated 5-6 million residents. The following pictures reflect this congestion…

This picture does not do justice to the clusters of houses and buildings all over the city just like those depicted here.

This picture does not do justice to the clusters of houses and buildings all over the city just like those depicted here.

Looking down from our hotel, I was amazed at the congestion of houses and traffic.

Looking down from our hotel, I was amazed at the congestion of houses and traffic.

There are motorized bikes all over the city--and they are fearless. This picture was taken when traffic was moving. Notice how these three motorcycles cut right in front of a moving bus! And this is the general rule--not an exception to the rule!

There are motorized bikes all over the city--and they are fearless. This picture was taken when traffic was moving. Notice how these three motorcycles cut right in front of a moving bus! And this is the general rule--not an exception to the rule!

To The Acropolis of Athens and The Parthenon

One of my very first posts showed a picture of the Athenian Acropolis from a distance. It was now our chance to see it up close and personal. However, there were other things to see along the way. For instance, the following picture is one of the Theater at Athens. It was one of about 40,000 theatres scattered throughout the regions of Greece, Turkey and Asia. By all standards the Athenian theater was small in size. It could only seat 6000 people. This is largely because it started out as an indoor theater. There was once a roof of wood upon the theater but the ravages of time removed it long ago.

This theater is still in use during the summer for outdoor plays.

This theater is still in use during the summer for outdoor plays.

A Closer Look At The Theater In Athens

A Glimpse At The Parthenon

This was the Temple dedicated to Athena, built in the 5th century B.C.

This was the Temple dedicated to Athena, built in the 5th century B.C. It sits atop the Acropolis of Athens.

Next to the Parthenon is the Erechtheum Temple. It is held up by six pillars shaped like maidens — the Caryatids. The Erechtheum takes its name from a shrine dedicated to the Greek hero Erichthonius, and the temple was dedicated to both Athena and Poseidon.

The temple was dedicated to both Athena and Poseidon.

The Erechtheum temple is next to the Parthenon. The Erechtheum temple was dedicated to both Athena and Poseidon.

Mars Hill Is Just Below These Temples

I always pictured Mars Hill as some giant sized hill, but as the picture below shows, it was not all that large.

Mars Hill, the place where Paul gave his famous sermon, recorded in Acts 17, is the stone hill just behind the tall pine tree in the center of the picture.

Mars Hill, the place where Paul gave his famous sermon, recorded in Acts 17, is the stone hill just behind the tall pine tree in the center of the picture.

As I stood on Mars Hill, looking up at the temples upon the Acropolis, I gained an even greater appreciation for Paul’s statement that God dwelleth not in temples made with hands (Acts 17). I can very easily envision Paul gesturing toward the Acropolis when he said these words.

As Paul stood in the midst of Mars Hill, this is how close the Acropolis and its temples were to Paul and his hearers.

As Paul stood in the midst of Mars Hill, this is how close the Acropolis and its temples were to Paul and his hearers.

As you approach Mars Hill, there is a plaque containing the Greek record of Paul’s sermon on Mars Hill. It was beyond thrilling to sit on Mars Hill and listen to Paul’s Sermon read unto us from Acts 17.

Shane Fisher, reading Paul's Sermon on Mars Hill, as recorded in Acts 17.

Shane Fisher, reading Paul's Sermon on Mars Hill, as recorded in Acts 17.

I want to go on and on about this, but again it is late, and the bus is coming early in the morning to take us to four of the seven churches of Asia sites. I’ll give the rest of the story in Athens in my next post, and move from there to some of Paul’s journeys by sea.

Thanks so much. Love to all.

BJC


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Published in: on May 25, 2009 at 4:55 pm  Leave a Comment  

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