From The Athenian Acropolis To The Aegean Sea

The Temple Of Olympian Zeus

From the Athenian Acropolis one can look down and see what is known as the Temple of Olympian Zeus.

This temple was dedicated to Zeus, the chief of the gods. Construction on the temple began in the 4th century BC but was not concluded until the 2nd century AD, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian. To honor Hadrian an arch was built for his entrance into the city. If you look near the lower left hand corner of the picture you can see Hadrian's arch with the columns on top. The completed temple was ultimately destroyed by barbarians in the 3rd century AD.

This temple was dedicated to Zeus, the chief of the gods. Construction on the temple began in the 4th century BC but was not concluded until the 2nd century AD, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Hadrian. To honor Hadrian an arch was built for his entrance into the city. If you look near the lower left hand corner of the picture you can see Hadrian's arch with the columns on top. The completed temple was ultimately destroyed by barbarians in the 3rd century AD. Much of the remaining ruins were used for other building projects in the city. All that is left is pictured above.

The Agora In Athens

We left the acropolis and descended toward the ancient Athenian agora (marketplace). What a beautiful view the merchants/shoppers had as they looked up at the Acropolis.

This picture was taken from the agora in Athens, looking up at the Acropolis.

This picture was taken from the agora in Athens, looking up at the Acropolis.

The following pictures are also from the agora in Athens, with a brief explanation under each picture.

A "stoa" is the word describing the practice in Ancient Greek architecture of providing a covered porch or walkway. These were commonly found in or near the marketplace. This one at Athens was among the most impressive. The style is known as Doric. These buildings provided an area for merchants to sell their goods, no matter the weather. These buildings were also used at times for religious gatherings. This stoa at Athens was originally built by King Attalos II of Pergamon, who ruled between 159 BC and 138 BC. It was destroyed in 267 A.D. by a Germanic nomadic people known as the Heruli. In the 1950's the Rockefeller family paid to have it restored.

A "stoa" is the word describing the practice in Ancient Greek architecture of providing a covered porch or walkway. These were commonly found in or near the marketplace. This one at Athens was among the most impressive. The style is known as Doric. These buildings provided an area for merchants to sell their goods, no matter the weather. These buildings were also used at times for religious gatherings. This stoa at Athens was originally built by King Attalos II of Pergamon, who ruled between 159 BC and 138 BC. It was destroyed in 267 A.D. by a Germanic nomadic people known as the Heruli. In the 1950's the Rockefeller family paid to have it restored.

A Fig Tree in the Agora at Athens

A Fig Tree in the Agora at Athens

Although it is somewhat hard to visualize from this picture, these ruins represent a theater built by Agrippa in 15 B.C. which had a seating capacity of about 1000 people. It was two-stories and was covered. However, it was also destroyed by fire in 267 AD. Later, around AD 400, a Gymnasium was erected on the site. Note the gigantic pedestals which were salvaged from the debris of Agrippa's Odeion.

Although it is somewhat hard to visualize from this picture, these ruins represent a theater built by Agrippa in 15 B.C. which had a seating capacity of about 1000 people. It was two-stories and was covered. However, it was also destroyed by fire in 267 AD. Later, around AD 400, a Gymnasium was erected on the site. Note the gigantic pedestals which were salvaged from the debris of Agrippa's Odeion.

This temple was built on the northwest side of the ancient Agora in Athens. It was dedicated to the god of metal-making. Construction began in 449 BC and was completed in 415 BC. It is regarded by many as the best preserved ancient Greek temple. It was known for, among other things, housing bronze statues of Athena and Hephaestos, the god of metal.

This temple of Hephaistos was built on the northwest side of the ancient Agora in Athens. It was dedicated to the god of metal-making. Construction began in 449 BC and was completed in 415 BC. It is regarded by many as the best preserved ancient Greek temple. It was known for, among other things, housing bronze statues of Athena and Hephaistos, the god of metal.

Upon leaving the Agora in Athens we returned to our hotel for another nice meal and preparations to leave the next morning aboard a cruise ship at the Port of Pieres, just a few miles from Athens. In my next post, we will explore Paul’s journeys on the Aegean Sea and some of his missionary excursions to the surrounding islands.

Love and prayers to all,

BJC

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Published in: on May 26, 2009 at 4:32 pm  Leave a Comment  

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